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What Botswana Low Water Levels Mean for Your Okavango Delta Safari

What Botswana Low Water Levels Mean for Your Okavango Delta Safari

As the current water levels are lower than usual, your Okavango Delta safari is set to be filled with great wildlife sightings and stunning landscape photos whilst on foot or in the game drive vehicle.

Water levels of the Okavango Delta, a unique and ever-changing ecosystem, are dependent on the annual rainfall at its source in the Central Highlands of Angola, thousands of kilometres away, where the flood waters originate. Across Southern Africa, rainfall levels have been less than average this year, which this has led to a particularly dry winter across Botswana and low flooding in the Okavango Delta. This is to be expected, as every decade rainfall patterns shift resulting in drier years than normal.

So, what does this mean for your safari?

Under One Botswana Sky, Botswana, Okavango Delta, Botswana Safari, Okavango Delta Safari, Botswana Low Water Levels, Botswana Dry Season, Dry Season Safari

© Joyce Edwards

If you are coming on safari to Botswana over this period, you will likely have to swap the water-based activities for excellent game-viewing. So, it’s not such a bad trade-off after all! Mokoro trips, motorised boat cruises and fishing activities are dependent on water levels and not all camps will be able to offer these activities at present due to lower than average water levels.

Our camps and lodges are open and operating as usual, except for water activities which have been suspended from early April until recently. The good news is that Moremi Crossing and Gunn’s Camp are still able to offer short mokoro trips. Mma Dinare and Rra Dinare camps along with Pom Pom are still only offering land activities at this time. Water levels are still extremely low and therefore unsafe for the mokoro activity, as there are large pods of hippos in the sparse pools of water that remain.

Read: Seasonal Botswana – Dry Season Safari

The upside is, of course, that this dryness creates perfect conditions for some great game viewing opportunities. This is because wildlife is forced to journey to and concentrate around the limited permanent water sources, while the thinning bush and short grasses means fewer places for animals to shelter within. An excellent way of experiencing Botswana’s remote wilderness is journeying out on foot on a walking safari. These guided bush walks are approximately three hours long and the pace is slow to encourage an immersive connection with nature.

 

Under One Botswana Sky, Botswana, Okavango Delta, Botswana Safari, Okavango Delta Safari, Botswana Low Water Levels, Botswana Dry Season, Dry Season Safari

© Reto Boltshauser

Get in touch with us to find out more on what the coming months have in store for your safari.

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